Throwing Away Your Nerves! (So you Don’t Throw Up Your Lunch) By Olivia Clack (Eliza/Pirate)

IMG_1047When I was younger I always had dreams of being on a stage but my lack of confidence on stage created a bit of a problem. I remember my first time preforming for my drama class at Merritt Island High School. I was so scared I couldn’t think strait and before I even spoke I knew I would sound nervous. I stood on stage for three minutes stretching my arms over my head, jumping up and down, fighting the urge to use the restroom, and all while trying to remember how to breathe. I kept giggling but I knew I wouldn’t get a good grade for laughing or doing yoga (sadly). So I did my best and flubbed through the whole thing, forgetting lines and breaking my character.

 

The most frustrating thing about getting nerves is when you know you are talented enough to succeed yet your own mentality is keeping you from in fact doing so. Luckily I found a way to get over my fears! I know I’m not the only one who has suffered from this horrid mental block, so here is what worked for me and what hopefully will work for you.

 

Prepare Prepare Prepare

If you know your piece inside and out and have practiced it until it’s second nature you will be so much more relaxed on the day of the audition. Let’s be honest, their is no way your going to be at your best if you haven’t practiced your best.

 

Visualization

Once you know your piece well, start practicing with very vivid images of what the  audition or occasion will look like. Imagine walking on to the stage or into the               space where you will be performing and think of being in the moment of the actual audition. This by far has helped me the most! I have actually forgotten lines while visualizing but I keep at it and get comfortable with the thought of performing for that particular event.

 

Focus On Breathing

When you are actually performing the first thing that nerves affect is typically your breathing. So before the audition starts I literally focus everything on relaxing my muscles and on deep breathing. I even still stretch but before I enter the audition room, of course.

 

Those are the things that worked for me personally, everyone has their own quarks or exercises that work specifically for them. Mess around with it and figure out what works best for you!

BEST OF  LUCK

 

Not Just Company by Nicole Ramos (Mrs. Darling)

Company Rehearsal

Many of you know the term “Company” or “chorus”. In theater it usually means anyone who doesn’t have a lead type role in the show. Most of the cast of Peter Pan is considered as company. Some might say, “Better luck next time!”, but I, myself, find being a part of the company is almost better then being in a lead role. The main reason why, is because as a member of the company you get to play so many different types of characters, from hyper, depressed,  or maybe you even get to play a small child. As a lead role, you own one personality that you have to portray for a good sum of two hours.  As part of the company, every time you enter the stage you are someone different, a new personality.

Rehearsal

Now, being a company member is important. Every show needs a company of supporting actors to make the show an actual solid show. Lead actors aren’t able to hold a show together; they can’t play every character plus their own. It would drive them absolutely mad. The company is there to fill in the minor characters and to create a real life feeling to a show. The company of our show is a fantastic one, everyone is committed and so very talented and it is starting to show with the rehearsals we have been having so far. In my opinion, every company member is also a lead character.

Behind the Scenes! by Ashley Bradley (Pirate)

It takes a lot more to be able to put on a production than just manning the lights, prepping the stage and the natural born talent of MIHS student actors. There are also many variables that are considered and contribute to every fabulous performance our school and staff put on. This process can be grueling at times but it also has the potential to become one of the best moments of your life and high school career

The first step to putting on a successful show includes balancing your budget. Mrs Duprey spends most of her time figuring out different fundraisers to participate in to acquire the money that each show demands. We do fundraisers that involve selling pasta, bags of candy, cookie dough and even coupons! Each fundraiser is an individual piece of the grand puzzle we like to call Peter Pan. We also sell ads in our program, if you or your business is interested in buying ad space in our program and on this website, please see our donations page.  Every penny we raise, is one cent closer to our goal, and that is a fabulous show!

Along with raising funds comes the real hard work, learning the songs and dances, and building a certain chemistry with your fellow cast. We spend much of our rehearsal time learning, learning and LEARNING lyrics, harmonies and melodies. You would think that the angels have descended from heaven after our music director is finished with us.

Rehearsal Time!

Rehearsal Time!

Tech week is the moment of truth, where each and every cast member’s morale is brutally tested. During tech week, one truly understands the virtue of patience. This is the point in our journey where every detail is squared away and every kink fixed. Frustration and exhaustion are factors that sometimes come into play during this week, but these feelings are soon replaced with the adrenaline and excitement of opening night!

Putting on a show like Peter Pan will prove to be a great and exhilarating experience, and nothing compares to the energy and applause of the audience, the pulse pumping through your chest as you belt those final notes and leave the stage, taking with you lifelong friendships and memories that are engraved in you forever.

WELCOME!

VIdeo!

Please join the Merritt Island High School Theatre Arts department’s on their journey from audition to closing night with the show Peter Pan. The cast and crew will chronicle their experiences producing this musical  by Piers Chater Robinson; videos, blog posts from characters, directors, and actors, photos, and  lesson plans for teachers will be updated frequently. Please visit often and join us on our flight to Never, Never Land.

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